Michael Jackson – ‘Off The Wall’, released August 10, 1979

9222f754b1010f437aa42954ec151c4c9950f64b
Read the original Rolling Stone review for Michael Jackson’s ‘Off The Wall’ below

Like any an aging child star, Michael Jackson has had to grow up gracefully in public in order to survive.

Until now, he’s understandably clung to the remnants of his original Peter Pan of Motown image while cautiously considering the role of the young prince. Off the Will marks Jackson’s first decisive step toward a mature show-business personality, and except for some so-so material, it’s a complete success.

A slick, sophisticated R&B-pop showcase with a definite disco slant, Off the Wall presents Michael Jackson as the Stevie Wonder of the Eighties. This resemblance is strongest on “I Can’t Help It” (cowritten by Wonder), in which Jackson’s vocal syncopation is reminiscent of the master’s breathless, dreamy stutter.

Throughout, Jackson’s feathery-timbred tenor is extraordinarily beautiful. It slides smoothly into a startling falsetto that’s used very daringly. The singer’s ultradramatic phrasing, which rakes huge emotional risks and wins every time, wrings the last drop of pathos from Tom Bahler’s tear-jerker, “She’s Out of My Life.” “Don’t Stop ’til You Get Enough” (written and coproduced by Jackson) is one of a handful of recent disco releases that works both as a dance track and as an aural extravaganza comparable to Earth, Wind and Fire’s “Boogie Wonderland.” The rest of the dance music touches several grooves, from jazzy South American to mainstream pop funk.

A triumph for producer Quincy Jones as well as for Michael Jackson, Off the Wall represents discofied post-Motown glamour at its classiest.

By November 1, 1979
Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s